Lore:Flaminius Auctor Answers Your Questions

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Flaminius Auctor Answers Your Questions
Flaminius Auctor answers questions on lore

"To many, Mehrunes Dagon and Molag Bal seem very similar. Can you point out the major differences between these two hated Daedric Princes?" – TheHumanFloyd

Flaminius Auctor says, "To mere mortals who find themselves on the receiving end of Daedric devastation, distinctions between the worst of the Princes may seem academic at best. However, though the ends of Dagon and Bal seem similar, their means could not be more distinct. Mehrunes Dagon revels in direct destruction—his cultists will set your city on fire and burn it to the ground. Molag Bal exists to dominate and deceive—his cultists will persuade you that a plague is loose, and the only way to stop it is to burn your city down yourself."


"What of Mehrunes Dagon's claim to Tamriel? He can't have given it up, since his most vigorous attempt to enforce it is in the future. How does he feel about Molag Bal encroaching on 'his' property?" – Vivian Unshadowed

Flaminius Auctor says, "Though your question is somewhat confusingly phrased, I'll answer as best I can. We all must fear and beware Dagon's future plans, for his hunger for destruction is insatiable, and there can be no doubt but that his cultists plan deep and long-burgeoning conspiracies. It's also well known that Mehrunes Dagon and Molag Bal are bitter rivals, and will thwart each other's schemes if given the opportunity. Indeed, such events may occur and never come to public knowledge!"


"If the Dragonfires are not lit [during ESO], wouldn't it be free reign for Mehrunes Dagon to also attempt to invade Tamriel with Oblivion Gates?" – KowalRoyale

Flaminius Auctor says, "I'm by no means a scholar of such matters, but it seems to me that the affairs of the Divines are not that simple, and there is probably a lot more involved in things like cross-planar invasions than we know—possibly even more than we CAN know. The Mundus is no flimsy tissue of conjecture; the gods wrought well when they made the world, and it is not so easily unmade."